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Georgia 2023 Sales Tax Guide

Georgia 2023 Sales Tax Guide

Georgia Sales Tax in a Word

Welcome, tax adventurers, to the land of Georgia sales tax! In a single word, we sum up this fascinating topic: dynamic. The Georgia sales tax landscape is ever-evolving, filled with twists and turns that keep business owners on their toes. As we embark on this tax journey together, we'll explore the nuances, regulations, and obligations that make Georgia sales tax a captivating adventure. So, batten down the hatches and get ready to uncover the secrets of Georgia sales tax in a word: dynamic.

 

 

 


Georgia Sales Tax Contacts

In the state of Georgia, the entity responsible for managing sales tax is the Georgia Department of Revenue (DOR). They are your trusty navigators through the seas of Georgia sales tax.

To get in touch with the Georgia Department of Revenue, you can use the following channels:

  1. Website: Set your sails to their official website at https://dor.georgia.gov/. It's a treasure trove of valuable information, resources, and online services to help you navigate the world of Georgia sales tax.

  2. Phone: If you prefer direct communication, you can contact the Georgia DOR by phone. They have dedicated customer service representatives ready to assist you with your sales tax inquiries. You can find their phone number on their website.

  3. Email or Mail: For specific inquiries or the need to submit documents, the Georgia DOR provides email and mailing addresses for correspondence. You can locate these contact details on their website.

Remember, the Georgia Department of Revenue is there to help you navigate the complex waters of sales tax compliance. Whether you have questions about registration, filing, exemptions, or any other sales tax-related matter, they are your guides and allies throughout your tax adventure in Georgia.

If you have any more questions, please feel free to contact us so we can assist you with your sales tax needs.

 

 

Do You Have Nexus in Georgia?

As we set sail on our Georgia sales tax journey, it's time to ask a crucial question: Do you have nexus in Georgia? Nexus, like a hidden treasure map, determines whether your business has a significant enough presence in the state to warrant sales tax obligations. Understanding nexus is vital to avoid any stormy encounters with non-compliance. So, grab your compass and join us as we explore the various factors that create nexus in the great state of Georgia. Let's chart our course and uncover the secrets of Georgia sales tax nexus!

 

What Creates Sales Tax Nexus in Georgia?

It's crucial to understand the factors that create sales tax nexus in this fair state. Nexus, like a lighthouse guiding your compliance ship, determines whether your business has a significant presence that requires you to collect and remit sales tax. In the land of Georgia, nexus can be established through various means, including physical presence, economic activity, and even through certain affiliations. Join us on this tax adventure as we unravel the mysteries of sales tax nexus in Georgia and discover what it takes to navigate the seas of compliance with confidence.

When it comes to establishing physical nexus in Georgia, it's all about setting anchor on its shores. In this maritime realm of sales tax, physical presence can create nexus, signaling your obligation to collect and remit sales tax. In Georgia, physical nexus is established through various activities, including:

  1. Having a Physical Location: If your business has a physical store, office, warehouse, or any other brick-and-mortar presence in Georgia, you've dropped anchor and established physical nexus.

  2. Storing Inventory: Storing inventory in Georgia, even if it's temporarily, can also create physical nexus. So be aware of any storage facilities or warehouses you utilize in the state.

  3. Using Sales Representatives or Agents: If you have sales representatives or agents operating within Georgia, whether employees or independent contractors, they can create physical nexus on your behalf.

Remember, establishing physical nexus in Georgia means you're sailing into the realm of sales tax obligations. It's important to keep a keen eye on your business activities within the state to ensure compliance with the laws of the land.

Economic nexus in Georgia is like a powerful undercurrent in the world of sales tax. It signifies that your business has a significant economic presence in the state, even if you lack a physical presence. As of April 1, 2020, Georgia has adopted economic nexus provisions in accordance with the South Dakota v. Wayfair Supreme Court ruling. Here's what creates economic nexus in Georgia:

  1. Sales Revenue Threshold: If your business's total retail sales exceed $100,000 or you engage in 200 or more separate retail sales transactions in Georgia within a calendar year, you'll be swept into the realm of economic nexus. It's like catching a wave that propels you into the sales tax obligations of the state.

Once economic nexus is established, you're required to collect and remit sales tax on your taxable sales within Georgia. So, keep a vigilant eye on your sales figures and ensure compliance with these economic thresholds to stay on the right side of the tax tide.

Affiliate nexus is a type of nexus that occurs when an out-of-state retailer has certain arrangements with affiliates located in Georgia. These arrangements can include:

  • Selling the same line of products under a similar name.

  • Providing assembly, delivery, or maintenance services for the remote vendor's Georgia customers.

  • Conducting any other activities significantly associated with the out-of-state seller's establishment or maintenance of a Georgia market.

When an out-of-state retailer has affiliate nexus in Georgia, they are required to collect and remit Georgia sales tax on all sales made to Georgia customers.

Here are some examples of how affiliate nexus can be created:

  • An out-of-state retailer has an affiliate in Georgia that sells the retailer's products.

  • An out-of-state retailer has an affiliate in Georgia that provides assembly, delivery, or maintenance services for the retailer's products.

  • An out-of-state retailer has an affiliate in Georgia that conducts marketing or advertising campaigns for the retailer's products.

If you are an out-of-state retailer that has any of the arrangements described above with an affiliate in Georgia, you may have affiliate nexus in Georgia. You should contact the Georgia Department of Revenue (DOR) to determine if you are required to collect and remit Georgia sales tax.

Click-through nexus is a type of nexus that occurs when an out-of-state retailer has an agreement with a Georgia resident(s) whereby the resident, for a consideration, directly or indirectly refers potential purchasers to the seller by an internet link or otherwise, and cumulative gross receipts from sales from such referrals exceed \$50,000 during the preceding 12 months.

When an out-of-state retailer has click-through nexus in Georgia, they are required to collect and remit Georgia sales tax on all sales made to Georgia customers.

Here are some examples of how click-through nexus can be created:

  • An out-of-state retailer has an agreement with a Georgia resident to pay the resident a commission for each sale made to a Georgia customer that is referred by the resident.

  • An out-of-state retailer has an agreement with a Georgia resident to place an internet link on the resident's website that directs potential customers to the retailer's website.

  • An out-of-state retailer has an agreement with a Georgia resident to use the resident's email list to send out marketing messages about the retailer's products.

If you are an out-of-state retailer that has any of the arrangements described above with a Georgia resident, you may have click-through nexus in Georgia. You should contact the Georgia Department of Revenue (DOR) to determine if you are required to collect and remit Georgia sales tax.

The DOR website has a wealth of information about click-through nexus in Georgia, including a list of factors that can create click-through nexus and a list of frequently asked questions.

Marketplace Nexus is a type of nexus that occurs when an out-of-state retailer uses a marketplace facilitator to sell goods or services in Georgia. A marketplace facilitator is a company that facilitates retail sales on behalf of sellers by providing a platform for sellers to list their goods or services, process payments, and ship orders.

In Georgia, marketplace facilitators are required to collect and remit Georgia sales tax on all sales made through their platform by sellers who have $100,000 or more in Georgia sales or 200 or more separate transactions in Georgia in the previous or current calendar year.

For example, if an out-of-state retailer sells goods or services through Amazon, and the retailer's sales through Amazon to Georgia customers exceed $100,000 or there are 200 or more separate transactions, Amazon is required to collect and remit Georgia sales tax on all sales made through its platform by the retailer to Georgia customers.

Marketplace nexus is a relatively new concept, and there is still some uncertainty about how it will be applied in practice. However, it is important for out-of-state retailers to be aware of marketplace nexus and to take steps to ensure that they are in compliance with Georgia law.

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia Sales Tax Registration

Welcome to the exciting realm of Georgia sales tax registration. Just as a ship needs a sturdy anchor, your business needs to drop anchor in the land of Georgia to embark on its sales tax journey. Registering for a sales tax account is the crucial first step to setting sail on the seas of compliance. By obtaining a Georgia sales tax license, you'll gain the authority to collect and remit sales tax to the state. So, prepare to navigate the registration process, understand your obligations, and ensure smooth sailing through the intricate waters of Georgia sales tax. Let's delve into the details of Georgia sales tax registration and embark on this tax adventure together!

 

How to Register for Sales Tax in Georgia

If you're ready to embark on the voyage of Georgia sales tax compliance, it's time to learn how to register for sales tax in this fair state. Follow these steps to set sail on your registration journey:

  1. Gather Your Information: Before you begin, gather the necessary information. You'll need your federal employer identification number (EIN), business details, including your legal name and address, and other relevant information such as your business structure and owner details.

  2. Access the Georgia Tax Center: Chart your course to the Georgia Tax Center website, which serves as your port of call for sales tax registration. Create an account if you don't have one or log in if you're already a member.

  3. Navigate to the Sales Tax Registration: Once logged in, navigate to the sales tax section of the Georgia Tax Center. Look for the option to register for a sales and use tax account. This is where you'll officially drop anchor and register your business.

    (Need a little refresher on use tax? Check out our sales tax vs use tax blog here.)

  4. Complete the Registration Form: Fill out the registration form with the required information. Be accurate and thorough, ensuring all details are entered correctly.

  5. Submit Your Application: Once the form is completed, review it carefully to ensure accuracy. Double-check that all information is correct and up-to-date. When you're confident in its accuracy, submit your application.

  6. Await Confirmation: After submitting your registration, you'll receive confirmation from the Georgia Department of Revenue. They will provide you with your sales tax number and other relevant details. Keep this information safe, as it will be your key to compliance.

Congratulations, tax adventurers! You've successfully registered for sales tax in Georgia. You're now equipped to navigate the sales tax seas of the state. Remember, accurate record-keeping and timely filing are essential for smooth sailing. Set your compass towards compliance and embark on this exciting tax adventure!

 

How Much Does it Cost to Register for a Georgia Sales Tax License?

There is no fee to register for a Georgia sales tax license.

 

Do I Need a Federal Tax ID Number or EIN to Register for a Georgia Sales Tax License?

Yes, you need a Federal Tax ID Number or EIN to register for a Georgia Sales Tax License. A Federal Tax ID Number is a nine-digit number that is used to identify businesses and individuals for tax purposes. It is also known as an Employer Identification Number (EIN).

You can apply for a Federal Tax ID Number online through the IRS website. The application process is free and takes about five minutes to complete.

Once you have your Federal Tax ID Number, you can use it to register for a Georgia Sales Tax License. You can register for a Georgia Sales Tax License online through the Georgia Department of Revenue website. The registration process is free and takes about 15 minutes to complete.

Here are the steps on how to register for a Georgia Sales Tax License:

  1. Go to the Georgia Department of Revenue website and click on the "Businesses" tab.

  2. Click on the "Sales and Use Tax" link.

  3. Click on the "Register for Sales Tax" link.

  4. Enter your business information, including your Federal Tax ID Number.

  5. Click on the "Submit" button.

  6. You will receive a confirmation email with your Georgia Sales Tax License number.

You must keep your Georgia Sales Tax License number in a safe place. You will need it to file your sales tax returns and to pay sales tax.

 

Which Agencies in Georgia Might I Need to Register With Additionally?

 

While the Georgia Department of Revenue (DOR) oversees sales tax matters, there are other agencies you may need to register with depending on your business activities. Here are a few key agencies to keep in mind:

  1. Georgia Secretary of State: If you operate as a corporation, limited liability company (LLC), or partnership, you may need to register with the Georgia Secretary of State. This registration establishes your legal entity in the state.

  2. Georgia Department of Labor: If you have employees, you'll need to register with the Georgia Department of Labor for unemployment tax purposes. This ensures compliance with state employment regulations.

  3. Local Tax Authorities: Depending on your business location, you may need to register with local tax authorities such as counties, cities, or special tax districts. These entities may impose additional taxes or require separate registration.

Remember, each business is unique, and the agencies you need to register with can vary based on your specific circumstances. It's important to research and understand your obligations to ensure full compliance with all relevant agencies. Consider consulting with a tax professional or advisor to navigate the registration process smoothly.

Keep your sails high, tax adventurers, and navigate the registration process with confidence to stay on course in the exciting world of Georgia sales tax!

 

 

Collecting Sales Tax in Georgia

When it comes to Georgia sales tax, the process of collecting can be as exhilarating as a treasure hunt. As a business owner, it's your duty to collect sales tax from your customers on behalf of the state. Let's dive into the realm of collecting sales tax in Georgia and uncover the key aspects you need to know...

 

How to collect sales tax in Georgia

Here's a step-by-step guide to help you navigate the process:

  1. Determine Taxability: First and foremost, identify which sales are subject to sales tax in Georgia. Review the Georgia Department of Revenue's guidelines to understand what goods and services are taxable. Keep in mind any exemptions or special rules that may apply.

  2. Calculate the Tax Amount: Once you determine that a sale is taxable, calculate the correct sales tax amount. Georgia sales tax rates can vary based on location, so make sure you apply the appropriate rate. You can find the current rates on the Georgia Department of Revenue's website or use a reliable sales tax calculator.

  3. Include Tax in the Sales Price: When displaying prices to your customers, include the sales tax in the total amount. This ensures transparency and avoids any surprises at the point of sale. Make sure your pricing and receipts clearly indicate the total amount including sales tax.

  4. Record-Keeping: Maintain thorough and accurate records of your sales transactions. Keep track of the sales amounts, tax collected, and any exemptions or discounts applied. These records will be invaluable for tax reporting, audits, and maintaining compliance.

  5. Remit Sales Tax to the State: Remember, you're acting as a collector of sales tax on behalf of the state. Set aside the sales tax you collect and remit it to the Georgia Department of Revenue according to your designated filing frequency (monthly, quarterly, or annually). Use the online portal or follow the instructions provided by the state for remittance.

By following these steps, you'll navigate the seas of Georgia sales tax collection with confidence. Remember, accurate collection and timely remittance are essential for smooth sailing in the world of tax compliance.

 

What Sales are Subject to Sales Tax in Georgia?

In Georgia, sales of tangible personal property are subject to sales tax. Tangible personal property is anything that can be touched or felt. It includes, but is not limited to, furniture, appliances, clothing, electronics, and food.

Sales of services are generally not subject to sales tax in Georgia. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. For example, sales of admissions to sporting events, concerts, and other events are subject to sales tax. Sales of telecommunications services, such as telephone and internet service, are also subject to sales tax.

The sales tax rate in Georgia is 4%. However, there are some local governments that have imposed additional sales taxes. For example, the city of Atlanta has a local sales tax of 1.9%.

There are a number of items that are exempt from sales tax in Georgia. These items include, but are not limited to:

  • Food and medicine

  • Prescription drugs

  • Gasoline and diesel fuel

  • Utilities

  • Newspapers and magazines

  • Books

  • Clothing and footwear for children under the age of 12

  • Funeral goods and services

If you are unsure whether or not a particular sale is subject to sales tax, you should contact the Georgia Department of Revenue.

 

Is Software as a Service (SaaS) taxed in Georgia?

SaaS is not currently taxed in Georgia. As of June 2023, SaaS is not listed as a taxable service in the Georgia Code and the transaction does not include the exchange of tangible personal property. This is because SaaS is a subscription service that provides access to software applications over the internet. In Georgia, unless the service is expressly noted as a taxable service, it is considered not taxable.

However, the Georgia legislature is working on a bill (HB 170) that would tax some digital goods and services, including SaaS. If this bill is passed, SaaS would become taxable in Georgia.

If you are a business owner that sells SaaS in Georgia, you should be aware of the potential for this bill to be passed. You should also be aware of the sales tax laws and regulations in other states where you sell SaaS.

If you are a business that sells SaaS, you should monitor the situation closely and consult with a tax advisor if you have any questions. 

 

What is Exempt from Georgia Sales Tax?

Here are some of the items that are exempt from sales tax in Georgia:

  • Food and medicine: Food and medicine, including prescription drugs, are exempt from sales tax in Georgia.

  • Gasoline and diesel fuel: Gasoline and diesel fuel are exempt from sales tax in Georgia. However, there is a state excise tax on gasoline and diesel fuel.

  • Utilities: Utilities, such as water, sewer, and trash collection, are exempt from sales tax in Georgia.

  • Newspapers and magazines: Newspapers and magazines are exempt from sales tax in Georgia.

  • Books: Books are exempt from sales tax in Georgia.

  • Clothing and footwear for children under the age of 12: Clothing and footwear for children under the age of 12 are exempt from sales tax in Georgia.

  • Funeral goods and services: Funeral goods and services are exempt from sales tax in Georgia.

In addition to these items, there are a number of other exemptions that may apply. For example, sales of food to certain nonprofit organizations are exempt from sales tax. Sales of goods to the federal government are also exempt from sales tax.

 

Who is Eligible for Georgia Sales Tax Exemptions?

There are a number of groups of people who are eligible for sales tax exemptions in Georgia. These groups include:

  • Nonprofit organizations: Nonprofit organizations that are organized and operated exclusively for religious, charitable, scientific, literary, or educational purposes are eligible for sales tax exemptions on the purchase of goods and services that are used directly in the conduct of their activities.

  • Government agencies: Government agencies are eligible for sales tax exemptions on the purchase of goods and services that are used directly in the conduct of their activities.

  • Certain individuals: Certain individuals, such as the elderly, disabled, and low-income individuals, may be eligible for sales tax exemptions on the purchase of certain goods and services.

To be eligible for a sales tax exemption, you must meet the requirements of the exemption. For example, to be eligible for the nonprofit organization exemption, you must be organized and operated exclusively for religious, charitable, scientific, literary, or educational purposes.

 

What Should I Do If My Customer is Exempt from Sales Tax in Georgia?

Encountering customers who are exempt from sales tax in Georgia is akin to spotting a unique creature in the vast tax ocean. When faced with such customers, it's important to handle the situation with care and ensure compliance. Here's what you should do if your customer is exempt from sales tax in Georgia:

  1. Verify the Exemption Certificate: Request that your customer provides a valid Georgia sales tax exemption certificate. This certificate serves as proof of their exemption status. Ensure the certificate includes all required information and is properly filled out.

  2. Keep Records: Maintain accurate records of the exempt sales transactions. Keep a copy of the exemption certificate for your records, along with details of the transaction, such as the customer's name, date of purchase, and the amount of the sale. These records will serve as your proof of compliance in case of future audits.

  3. Do Not Collect Sales Tax: If your customer provides a valid exemption certificate, you are not required to collect sales tax on their purchase. Be sure to exclude the exempt amount from your sales tax calculations and record-keeping.

  4. Exercise Caution: While exempt customers may not pay sales tax, it's essential to exercise caution and verify their exemption status. Accept exemption certificates only from customers who qualify for the specific exemption category outlined in Georgia's sales tax laws.

Remember, maintaining compliance with sales tax regulations is of utmost importance. Failure to properly handle exempt transactions could result in penalties or other consequences. Stay diligent, keep accurate records, and follow the guidelines provided by the Georgia Department of Revenue to ensure smooth sailing in the realm of tax compliance.

 

What Happens If I Lose a Georgia Sales Tax Exemption Certificate?

Losing a Georgia sales tax exemption certificate can feel like losing a vital piece of your treasure map. However, fear not, for there are steps you can take to navigate this situation:

  1. Contact the Exempt Customer: Reach out to the customer who provided the exemption certificate and explain the situation. Request a duplicate or replacement certificate from them. They should be able to provide you with a copy or guide you through the process of obtaining a new one.

  2. Maintain Documentation: While awaiting a replacement certificate, document your efforts to obtain a copy. Keep a record of your communication with the customer, including dates, times, and any relevant information exchanged. This will demonstrate your proactive approach in rectifying the situation.

  3. Consult with the Georgia Department of Revenue: If you're unable to obtain a replacement certificate from the customer, it's advisable to consult with the Georgia Department of Revenue. They can provide guidance on the appropriate steps to take in your specific situation.

  4. Exercise Due Diligence: Going forward, exercise due diligence when handling exempt transactions. Ensure you have proper procedures in place to safeguard and maintain copies of exemption certificates. This will help prevent future instances of lost certificates and ensure compliance with Georgia sales tax regulations.

Remember, maintaining accurate records and following proper procedures is crucial when dealing with exemption certificates. By taking the necessary steps to rectify the situation and consulting with the appropriate authorities, you can continue your tax journey in Georgia with confidence and integrity.

 

Filing and Paying Sales Taxes in Georgia

Filing and paying sales tax in Georgia is a crucial part of your tax journey, ensuring compliance with the state's regulations. Let's hoist our sails and explore the key aspects of filing and paying sales taxes in Georgia, including important deadlines, filing frequencies, and the necessary steps to stay on course with tax compliance. Prepare to embark on this tax adventure and discover the secrets to smooth sailing in the realm of Georgia sales tax.

 

When to File and Pay Sales Tax in Georgia

In the first six (6) months from the date of registration, sales and use tax returns should be filed on a monthly basis. The initial return should cover either the month specified on the registration application or the first month of the first transaction, whichever comes earlier.

If your sales tax liability has averaged less than $200.00 per month over a six month period, you may be permitted to file returns on a quarterly basis. 

If your sales tax liability has averaged less than $50.00 per month over a six month period, you may be permitted to file returns on an annual basis. 

 

What If a Georgia Sales Tax Filing Date Falls on a Weekend or Holiday?

As you navigate the intricate waters of Georgia sales tax, it's important to be aware of what happens when a filing date falls on a weekend or holiday. In such cases, the Georgia Department of Revenue sets sail with a special provision to ensure smooth tax compliance. Here's what you need to know:

If the regular filing due date falls on a weekend or legal holiday, the deadline is extended to the next business day. This means you have until the following business day to file your sales tax return and make the necessary payment.

For example, if the regular due date is on a Saturday, Sunday, or a designated legal holiday, you'll have until the next business day to submit your return and payment without incurring any penalties or interest charges. Keep in mind that the extended due date applies to both electronic and paper filings.

Remember, the Georgia Department of Revenue wants to ensure fair winds and smooth sailing in the realm of tax compliance. So, when a sales tax filing date falls on a weekend or holiday, take advantage of the extended deadline and navigate your way to timely and accurate filing.

 

How Do I File a Georgia Sales Tax Return?

When it comes to filing your Georgia sales tax return, it's time to chart a course to smooth tax compliance. Here's a step-by-step guide on how to file a Georgia sales tax return:

  1. Gather Your Information: Before you begin, gather all the necessary information for your sales tax return. This includes your sales records, tax collected, and any applicable exemptions or deductions. Having organized and accurate records will make the filing process much smoother.

  2. Access the Georgia Tax Center: Set sail for the Georgia Tax Center website, the online portal that serves as your port of call for filing sales tax returns. Create an account if you don't have one or log in if you're already a member.

  3. Navigate to the Sales Tax Section: Once logged in, navigate to the sales tax section of the Georgia Tax Center. Look for the option to file a sales tax return. This will typically be under the "Returns" or "Filing" section.

  4. Select the Appropriate Period: Choose the filing period for the return you're filing. It could be monthly, quarterly, or annually, depending on your filing frequency.

  5. Complete the Return: Fill out the sales tax return form with the required information. Provide accurate figures for your sales, tax collected, and any applicable exemptions or deductions. Double-check all entries to ensure accuracy.

  6. Review and Submit: Take a moment to review your completed return for any errors or omissions. Make sure all the information is accurate and up-to-date. Once you're confident in the details, submit your return electronically through the Georgia Tax Center.

  7. Make the Payment: If you have a tax liability for the period, make the necessary payment along with your return. Georgia Tax Center provides various payment options, including electronic funds transfer (EFT), credit card, or check.

  8. Keep Copies and Confirmation: After filing your return, make sure to keep copies of your filed return and any confirmation numbers or receipts as proof of compliance.

By following these steps, you'll successfully file your Georgia sales tax return and stay on course in the realm of tax compliance. Remember, accuracy, attention to detail, and timely filing are key to smooth sailing in the world of Georgia sales tax.

 

Failure to FIle Penalty 

A failure to file penalty of 10% of the sales tax due is assessed for each month that a sales tax return is not filed. The maximum failure to file penalty is 50% of the sales tax due.

 

Late Filing Penalty

A late filing penalty of 5% of the sales tax due or $5 per 30 days, whichever is greater, is assessed for each month that a sales tax return is filed late. The maximum late filing penalty is 25% of the sales tax due.

 

Underpayment Penalty

An underpayment penalty of 1% of the sales tax due is assessed for each month that sales tax is underpaid. The maximum underpayment penalty is 25% of the sales tax due.

 

Interest 

Interest accrues on past due sales tax at the rate of 1% per month.

 

Georgia Sales Tax Discounts

Yes. Georgia offers a 3% early payment discount on the first $3,000 of sales tax due, with a 0.5% discount on any remaining taxes owed. This discount is available for businesses that file and pay their sales tax electronically.

Here are some details on the early payment discount offered by the state of Georgia:

  • Who is eligible? Businesses that file and pay their sales tax electronically are eligible for the early payment discount.

  • What is the discount? The discount is 3% on the first $3,000 of sales tax due, with a 0.5% discount on any remaining taxes owed.

  • When is the discount available? The discount is available for sales tax that is due and paid electronically on or before the due date.

To take advantage of the early payment discount, businesses must file their sales tax returns electronically and pay their taxes electronically. Businesses can file their sales tax returns and pay their taxes electronically through the Georgia Department of Revenue's website or through a third-party vendor.

 

Georgia Sales Tax Holidays

Yes, there are two sales tax holidays in Georgia each year.

  • Back-to-School Sales Tax Holiday: This holiday is held in July and allows shoppers to purchase certain school supplies, clothing, and computers tax-free. The holiday runs from Friday, July 29, 2023 to Sunday, July 31, 2023.

  • Energy Star Sales Tax Holiday: This holiday is held in October and allows shoppers to purchase energy-efficient appliances and products tax-free. The holiday runs from Friday, October 13, 2023 to Sunday, October 15, 2023.

During these holidays, the state of Georgia waives sales tax on certain items. This can save shoppers a significant amount of money.

 

Here are some of the items that are exempt from sales tax during the Back-to-School Sales Tax Holiday:

  • School supplies: This includes items such as notebooks, pens, pencils, backpacks, and calculators.

  • Clothing: This includes items such as shirts, pants, skirts, and shoes.

  • Computers: This includes laptops, desktops, and tablets.

 

Here are some of the items that are exempt from sales tax during the Energy Star Sales Tax Holiday:

  • Appliances: This includes refrigerators, freezers, washing machines, dryers, dishwashers, and ovens.

  • Products: This includes light bulbs, air conditioners, and furnaces.

It is important to note that not all retailers participate in sales tax holidays. It is always best to check with the retailer before making a purchase to see if they are participating in the holiday.

 

 

5 Tips to Avoid Common Mistakes When Filing Georgia Sales Tax Returns

 

Ahoy, tax adventurers! When it comes to filing your Georgia sales tax returns, it's important to navigate the process smoothly to avoid common pitfalls along the way. To help you stay on course and steer clear of mistakes, here are five valuable tips to keep in mind:

  1. Maintain Accurate Records: Good record-keeping is crucial for successful tax filing. Keep detailed records of your sales, tax collected, exemptions, and any other relevant information. Accurate records ensure that your sales tax return reflects the correct figures, minimizing errors and potential discrepancies.

  2. Stay Updated on Tax Rates and Regulations: Sales tax rates and regulations can change, so it's essential to stay informed. Regularly check the Georgia Department of Revenue's website for updates on tax rates, exemptions, and any new filing requirements. Being aware of these changes helps you file accurately and comply with the latest regulations.

  3. File on Time: Timely filing is key to avoiding penalties and interest charges. Mark your calendar with the filing due dates for your specific filing frequency, whether it's monthly, quarterly, or annually. Set up reminders to ensure you file your returns on time, even if it means filing in advance to account for unexpected delays.

  4. Double-Check Your Math: Math errors can throw your sales tax return off course. Take the time to double-check all calculations to ensure accuracy. Utilize calculators or accounting software to minimize the risk of mathematical mistakes. Remember, accuracy in your calculations will contribute to a smooth tax filing experience.

  5. Review Your Return Thoroughly: Before submitting your sales tax return, review it carefully. Check for any typos, missing information, or inconsistencies. Verify that all required fields are completed, including your contact information and tax identification numbers. A thorough review helps you catch any potential errors or oversights before filing.

By following these tips, you'll navigate the filing process with confidence and accuracy, minimizing the chances of common mistakes. Remember, it's always a good idea to consult with a tax professional or advisor for specific guidance tailored to your business needs.

 


 

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Wyoming Sales Tax Guide

 

And don't forget to check out our blog about Economic Nexus, which serves as an invaluable resource for businesses who have sales that are subject to sales tax. 

 

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This blog is for informational purposes only and the information is accurate as of 2023-06-19. If you want legal advice on sales tax law for your business, please contact a State and Local Tax (SALT) professional. Keep in mind that sales tax regulations and laws are subject to change at any time. While we strive to keep our blog current, this blog possibly may be out of date by the time you review it.

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