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Connecticut 2023 Sales Tax Guide

Connecticut 2023 Sales Tax Guide

Connecticut Sales Tax in a Word

Hey there, tax trailblazers! Ready to embark on another thrilling adventure in the land of sales tax? Buckle up because today, we're headed to the Constitution State - yes, we're talking about Connecticut! 

Navigating the sales tax landscape can often feel like exploring uncharted territory, but don't worry! We're here to be your enthusiastic tour guides, helping you uncover every nook and cranny of the Connecticut sales tax system! With our roadmap in hand, we'll help you conquer sales tax like a champ, while still having time for a spot of tea (or coffee, if that's your jam)! 

In this lively "Connecticut Sales Tax Guide," we'll wander through the trails of nexus, uncover the secret treasures of exemptions, and even climb the peaks of filing and compliance. Yes, it might seem like a tough trek, but together, we'll make it a joy ride! 

Remember, folks, every business journey comes with its own set of challenges, but with a pinch of patience, a spoonful of knowledge, and a dash of humor, even the most daunting tax can become a piece of cake! So, grab your hiking boots (or just your favorite comfy slippers), and let's set out on this tax adventure together. Welcome to our Connecticut Sales Tax Guide - your trusty compass in the exciting world of sales tax! 

 

 


Connecticut Sales Tax Contacts

You may be asking, "How do I reach out to the Connecticut Department of Revenue?" Well, fret not, we've got you covered! 

The Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS), much like a friendly neighbor, is always there to lend a helping hand! The DRS is your go-to for all Connecticut tax-related questions and queries. Their virtual doors are open Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Eastern Time.

For a heart-to-heart chat (well, as much as one can have about taxes), give them a ring at 860-297-5962. You can also connect with them via their official website. Just head over to portal.ct.gov/drs, your one-stop-shop for all tax services, forms, and guides. 

Just remember, reaching out to the DRS is like calling into a popular radio show - patience is key! While they're as eager to help you out as a squirrel is to find an acorn, they're also juggling a ton of calls. So keep calm, maybe make a cup of hot cocoa, and remember - every great adventure requires a bit of waiting!

There are three pieces of information that you should have on hand before you contact the Connecticut Department of Revenue

Be sure that you have the following handy: 

  • Taxpayer Name

  • EIN

  • Sales & Use Tax ID Number (don’t worry, EIN will suffice if this number is misplaced)

If you are calling on behalf of someone else, or having someone else call on behalf of your business, you need to have one more piece of information: An active, signed Connecticut Power of Attorney (PDF).

Why?

If you do not have this, they will simply not be permitted to talk to you. This document authorizes the tax authorities in Connecticut to discuss a business’ taxes with someone other than the owner.

If you have any more questions, please feel free to contact us so we can assist you with your sales tax needs.

 

Do You Have Nexus in Connecticut?

Now, let's tackle the concept of nexus with gusto. Picture nexus as an economic bridge that ties your business to a state. If you've built that bridge with Connecticut, welcome to your sales tax responsibilities!

What throws you a 'you've got mail' from Connecticut? If your business has a substantial presence in the Nutmeg State, be it a storefront, an office, or even an employee, you've made a splash in the nexus pool. And, oh yes, if you're an e-commerce enthusiast with a Connecticut customer base, you're in the nexus mix too. Even if your HQ is in sunny California or bustling New York, delivering goods to Connecticut residents places you under their tax canopy.

But hold tight, we'll be venturing further into the intricacies of nexus and its potential impact on your business. Remember, when traversing the terrain of taxes, even a nexus cloud can have a silver lining.

 

What Creates Sales Tax Nexus in Connecticut?

Welcome back, my fellow financial adventurers! It's time to dig into the nitty-gritty: what exactly creates sales tax nexus in Connecticut?

The most straightforward nexus link is having a physical presence in the state. So if you've got a storefront, office, warehouse, or even an employee in the Constitution State, you've got physical nexus! It's like leaving your footprint in the Connecticut sand, and it signals you have sales tax responsibilities in the state.

Now here's where it gets a bit more intricate. As an online seller, if you exceed a specific sales or transaction threshold in Connecticut, you create economic nexus. This legislation came about in the wake of the landmark South Dakota v. Wayfair Supreme Court ruling in 2018. So even without stepping a foot in the state, if your online sales are booming with Connecticut customers, you've got nexus.

In Connecticut, economic nexus is established if a business meets two criteria:

  • Gross receipts: The business has gross receipts of at least $100,000 from sales into Connecticut in a 12-month period.
  • Transactions: The business has 200 or more separate transactions on the previous calendar year's sales in Connecticut.

If a business meets both of these criteria, it is considered to have economic nexus in Connecticut and is required to collect sales tax on all taxable sales made to Connecticut residents.

There are a few exceptions to economic nexus in Connecticut. For example, businesses that sell only digital goods or services are not subject to economic nexus. However, businesses that sell physical goods are subject to economic nexus even if they only sell those goods online.

Affiliate nexus can be established if you have affiliates - think subsidiaries or parent companies - operating in the state. It's like having a family member living in Connecticut; their presence can potentially create a tax obligation for you.

Affiliate nexus in Connecticut is established when an out-of-state retailer has certain arrangements with affiliates located in Connecticut. These arrangements include:

  • Direct or indirect ownership: The out-of-state retailer is directly or indirectly owned by a retailer engaged in a similar line of business in Connecticut.
  • Common branding: The out-of-state retailer and the affiliate use the same or similar branding, such as a common name, logo, or website.
  • Shared employees: The out-of-state retailer and the affiliate share employees who are involved in the sale of goods or services to Connecticut residents.
  • Shared inventory: The out-of-state retailer and the affiliate share inventory that is used to sell goods or services to Connecticut residents.

If an out-of-state retailer has any of these arrangements with an affiliate located in Connecticut, the out-of-state retailer will be considered to have affiliate nexus in Connecticut and will be required to collect sales tax on all taxable sales made to Connecticut residents.

Click-through nexus occurs in Connecticut when your business enters into an agreement with a resident in the state (often through a link on their website or an affiliate marketing program) to refer potential customers to you. The resident then receives a commission or other compensation based on the completed sales. It's a bit like having a sales agent or cheerleader in Connecticut promoting your products.

But, it's not just any agreement that triggers click-through nexus. In Connecticut, there's a sales threshold to this rule. If the cumulative gross receipts from sales by the business to customers in the state who are referred to the retailer by all residents with this type of agreement is in excess of $250,000 during the preceding four quarterly periods, then the business has established click-through nexus in Connecticut.

So, if you're raking in the big bucks thanks to the referrals from your affiliates in Connecticut, gear up! You've built the click-through nexus bridge and now it's time to handle your sales tax responsibilities in the Nutmeg State.

Marketplace nexus is a legal concept that allows states to require marketplace facilitators to collect sales tax on behalf of sellers who do not have a physical presence in the state. In Connecticut, marketplace nexus is established if a marketplace facilitator meets the following criteria:

  • Gross receipts: The marketplace facilitator has gross receipts of at least $250,000 from sales into Connecticut in a 12-month period.
  • Transactions: The marketplace facilitator facilitates 200 or more separate transactions on the previous calendar year's sales in Connecticut.

If a marketplace facilitator meets both of these criteria, it is considered to have marketplace nexus in Connecticut and is required to collect sales tax on all taxable sales made to Connecticut residents, even if the seller does not have a physical presence in the state.

There are a few exceptions to marketplace nexus in Connecticut. For example, marketplace facilitators that facilitate sales of only digital goods or services are not subject to marketplace nexus. However, marketplace facilitators that facilitate sales of physical goods are subject to marketplace nexus even if the goods are only sold online.

 

 

 

Connecticut Sales Tax Registration

As we journey further into the dynamic world of Connecticut sales tax, our next stop is an important one: sales tax registration. Imagine you've built your nexus bridge with Connecticut - what's next? Like a backstage pass at a rock concert, registering for sales tax is your ticket to doing business in the state. This process might seem a little daunting, but fear not, fellow business trailblazers! In this section, we'll break down the steps, requirements, and finer details of the Connecticut sales tax registration process.

 

How to Register for Sales Tax in Connecticut

There are two ways to set up a Connecticut sales tax account:

  • Online: You can register for a sales tax account online through the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS) website. To do this, you will need to create an account and provide some basic information about your business, such as your name, address, and tax identification number.

  • Mail: You can also register for a sales tax account by mail by completing and submitting the Sales and Use Tax Registration Application (Form REG-1). You can download this form from the DRS website.

Once you have registered for a sales tax account, you will be assigned a sales tax registration number. You will need to use this number on all sales tax returns that you file. You will also need to display your sales tax registration number prominently in your place of business.

 

How Much Does it Cost to Register for a Connecticut Sales Tax License?

To register for a Connecticut sales tax license, there is a $100 fee. This fee is non-refundable.

There are a few exceptions to the $100 fee. For example, the following entities are exempt from the fee:

  • Governments

  • Religious organizations

  • Nonprofit organizations

  • Educational institutions

If you are unsure whether or not you are exempt from the $100 fee, you should contact the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS).

 

Do I Need a Federal Tax ID Number or EIN to Register for a Connecticut Sales Tax License?

The quest for a Connecticut sales tax license does indeed require a special piece of information: a Federal Tax ID number, also known as an Employer Identification Number (EIN). Picture it as your business's unique identifier in the vast kingdom of federal taxation. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) uses your EIN to track your business's tax reporting. It's a little like your business's social security number! When registering for your sales tax license in Connecticut, you'll be asked to provide this EIN.

So ensure you have it handy before embarking on the sales tax registration journey. And remember, fellow trailblazers, every piece of paperwork is a stepping stone on the path to your business dreams! 

 

Which Agencies in Connecticut Might I Need to Register With Additionally?

Stepping into the Connecticut business scene can feel a bit like exploring a new city. There are different areas to visit, and in our case, different agencies with which you might need to register.

  1. Connecticut Secretary of the State: Before even thinking about sales tax, if you're planning to operate as an LLC, corporation, partnership, or non-profit, you'll need to register your business with the Connecticut Secretary of the State. It's like getting your passport stamped before you start your adventure!

  2. Connecticut Department of Labor: If you're hiring employees, your next stop will be the Department of Labor. They'll guide you through the process of setting up unemployment insurance tax for your staff.

  3. Connecticut Department of Revenue Services: You've already met this one on your sales tax journey, but remember, they might also be your point of contact for business income tax.

  4. Connecticut State Insurance Department: If you're planning to offer insurance to your employees, you'll need to explore the regulations and requirements with this department.

Navigating these agencies can be quite an adventure, but every step brings you closer to fully launching your business in the beautiful state of Connecticut. Remember, these aren't obstacles on your path, but milestones marking your business's growth.

 

Collecting Sales Tax in Connecticut

Collecting sales tax in Connecticut involves understanding the specific tax laws and rates applicable to your business's goods or services. Once you're registered and have your sales tax license, you'll add the appropriate sales tax to every taxable transaction and collect it from your customers.

 

How to collect sales tax in Connecticut

To register for a Connecticut sales tax account, you can do so online or by mail.

 

To register online:

  1. Go to the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS) website.
  2. Click on "Businesses" and then "Sales and Use Tax."
  3. Click on "Register for a Sales Tax Account."
  4. Follow the instructions on the screen.

 

To register by mail:

  1. Download and complete the Sales and Use Tax Registration Application (Form REG-1).

  2. Mail the completed application to:

Connecticut Department of Revenue Services Sales and Use Tax Division

P.O. Box 2960

Hartford, CT 06102-2960 

Once you have registered for a Connecticut sales tax account, you will be assigned a sales tax registration number. You will need to use this number on all sales tax returns that you file.

 

What Sales are Subject to Sales Tax in Connecticut?

As we navigate the winding paths of sales tax, let's delve into a crucial question: What sales are actually subject to sales tax in Connecticut?

In general, most goods and some services sold or rented in Connecticut are subject to sales tax. This can include anything from that beautifully handcrafted piece of furniture to certain landscaping services.

  1. Tangible Personal Property: First on the list is tangible personal property. This means any physical item, like books, jewelry, or electronics, that can be seen, weighed, measured, felt, or touched.

  2. Certain Services: Not all services in Connecticut are taxed, but some are. These can include services such as repair or renovation of tangible personal property and business analysis, management, consulting, and public relations services.

  3. Sales of Food and Beverage: Food sold in grocery stores is usually exempt, but prepared meals and those sold in a restaurant are typically taxed. The rules are a bit nuanced here, so be sure to check with the Department of Revenue Services for specifics.

  4. Digital Goods: E-books, online films, and other digital goods are also subject to sales tax.

Remember, this is a general guide, and exceptions do apply. Some goods and services are exempt, while others are taxed at a reduced rate. When in doubt, check with the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services or consult with a tax professional. With every nuance we unravel, we become more fluent in the language of sales tax!

 

Is Software as a Service (SaaS) taxed in Connecticut?

Yes, software as a service (SaaS) is taxed in Connecticut. SaaS is considered a service, and services are generally taxable in Connecticut. However, there is a 1% reduced rate for computer and data processing services, which includes SaaS.

The following are some examples of SaaS that are taxed in Connecticut:

  • Cloud-based accounting software

  • Customer relationship management (CRM) software

  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP) software

  • Human resources (HR) software

  • Marketing software

  • Project management software

  • Sales software

  • Telecommunications software

If you are a SaaS provider, you are required to collect sales tax on all sales of SaaS to Connecticut residents. You can collect sales tax using a variety of methods, including a physical sales tax register, a point-of-sale system, or a third-party sales tax collection service.

 

 

What is Exempt from Connecticut Sales Tax?

Let's illuminate the shadowy corners of our sales tax adventure by exploring what's exempt from Connecticut sales tax. Remember, exemptions are like hidden treasure troves in the tax world - opportunities to save!

  1. Certain Food Products: Most groceries and food items for home consumption are exempt. However, prepared meals and those served in restaurants typically aren't part of this tax-free banquet.

  2. Prescription Medication: Prescription drugs are typically exempt from sales tax in Connecticut. However, over-the-counter medication usually doesn't share this privilege.

  3. Certain Clothing and Footwear: Here's a fun fact - clothing and footwear under $50 are generally exempt from sales tax in Connecticut! Certain exceptions apply, so be sure to check the specifics.

  4. Newspapers and Magazines: You can stay informed tax-free! Newspapers issued at least weekly and certain magazines sold by subscription are exempt from Connecticut sales tax.

  5. Textbooks: University and college students rejoice! Textbooks are usually exempt when sold by educational institutions.

Remember, fellow tax adventurers, while this list gives a general overview, it's not exhaustive. The Connecticut Department of Revenue Services maintains a comprehensive list of exemptions. Always consult with a tax professional if you're unsure about whether an item is tax-exempt. Here's to discovering more tax secrets on our journey together!

 

Who is Eligible for Connecticut Sales Tax Exemptions?

The State of Connecticut currently exempts charitable organizations and government agencies from sales tax. 

 

What Should I Do If My Customer is Exempt from Sales Tax in Connecticut?

Let's imagine that sales tax is a bit like a game of tag. Everyone playing the game is "it" and must pay the tax, but there are a few lucky ones who have an invisible shield—sales tax exemptions. What happens when one of these shield-bearing customers comes into your business?

If your customer in Connecticut claims to be exempt from sales tax, it's not a time for panic. It's just a slightly different way to play the game. These are the steps to follow:

  1. Verify the Exemption: The customer should provide you with a valid certificate of exemption or a resale certificate. Picture it as their shield in the game of tax-tag.

  2. Keep Records: Maintain a copy of the exemption certificate. It's a good idea to keep these records for at least three years, just like keeping score in a game, in case there's ever a question about the exemption.

  3. No Sales Tax Charged: You should not collect sales tax on transactions where a valid exemption certificate has been provided. It's as if the customer is always in a safe zone where "tag" can't reach.

  4. Regular Reporting: Continue to report these sales on your tax return. They are often reported as exempt sales. It's your way of communicating with the game organizers, letting them know the customer was playing but with a shield.

Tax rules can seem as complex as the rules of an elaborate game, but with the right information and guidance, you can navigate it successfully. Remember, when in doubt, consult with a tax professional to ensure you're playing by the rules.

 

What Happens If I Lose a Connecticut Sales Tax Exemption Certificate?

If you lose your Connecticut sales tax exemption certificate, you can request a replacement certificate from the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS).

 

To do this, you can:

  • File Form CT-183, Application for Sales Tax Exemption Certificate. You can find this form on the DRS website.

  • Call the DRS at 860-297-2200.

  • Visit a DRS office in person.

 

When you request a replacement certificate, you will need to provide the following information:

  • Your name and address.

  • Your Social Security number or taxpayer identification number.

  • The type of exemption you are claiming.

  • The date your original certificate was issued.

The DRS will mail you a replacement certificate within a few weeks.

 

In the meantime, you can still claim a sales tax exemption if you have a valid purchase order or invoice from the seller. The purchase order or invoice must include the following information:

  • The date of the purchase.

  • The description of the goods or services purchased.

  • The price of the goods or services purchased.

  • The seller's name and address.

You should keep a copy of the purchase order or invoice for your records.

 

If you are a business and you lose your Connecticut sales tax exemption certificate, you may be able to claim a credit for the sales tax you paid on purchases that were exempt. To do this, you will need to file Form CT-30, Sales and Use Tax Return, and attach a copy of the purchase order or invoice.

The DRS may also impose a penalty if you lose your Connecticut sales tax exemption certificate. The penalty is $25 for the first offense and $50 for each subsequent offense.

 

Filing and Paying Sales Taxes in Connecticut

It's time to get down to the nitty gritty and learn how to file a sales tax return in the state of Connecticut. Buckle up and get ready to learn how to do it right.

 

When to File and Pay Sales Tax in Connecticut

Whether you're required to file monthly, quarterly, or annually in Connecticut depends on your business's total sales tax liability. 

If you're a high volume seller with a liability of $4,000 or more in the 12-month period ending the preceding June 30th, you'll be filing your sales tax returns on a monthly basis. Monthly sales tax returns are due on the last day of the month following the reporting period.

For example, the January sales tax return will be due February 28th (or 29th on a leap year).

If your sales tax liability was less than $4,000 for the 12-month period ending on the preceding June 30th, then you'll be filing quarterly. Quarterly returns are due on the last day of the month following the reporting quarter.

For businesses with a very small sales tax liability, annual filing might be the best fit. If your liability was less than $1,000 for the 12-month period ending on the preceding June 30th, you'd qualify for this option. Annual returns are due on January 31st of the following year.

No matter how frequently you're required to file, remember, punctuality is key in this quest. Late filings can lead to penalties, a plot twist we'd all like to avoid! When in doubt, consulting a tax professional can ensure you're on the right path.

 

What If a Connecticut Sales Tax Filing Date Falls on a Weekend or Holiday?

Ah, the weekend and holiday conundrum! This can often feel like the classic cliffhanger in our thrilling sales tax adventure. But don't fret, the State of Connecticut, like a considerate story author, has anticipated this plot twist.

If a sales tax due date falls on a weekend or holiday, Connecticut, much like many other states, allows you to file on the next business day without incurring a late filing penalty. It's like getting an extension on your quest deadline!

For example, if your filing deadline is Saturday, you will have until the following Monday to file. If Monday happens to be a holiday, then Tuesday becomes your due date.

Remember, it's always a good practice to file and remit sales tax as early as possible to avoid any last-minute hitches. This way, you'll be ahead of the game, navigating your sales tax journey like the seasoned explorer you are.

So take that, cliffhanger! Our sales tax adventure continues smoothly and on schedule.

 

How Do I File a Connecticut Sales Tax Return?

There are two ways to file a Connecticut sales tax return:

  • Online: You can file your return online using the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS) website. To do this, you will need to create an account and login to the website. Once you are logged in, you can select the "File a Sales Tax Return" option.

  • By mail: You can also file your return by mail. To do this, you will need to download and print Form OS-114 from the DRS website. Once you have printed the form, you will need to complete it and mail it to the following address:

Connecticut Department of Revenue Services
Sales Tax Unit
P.O. Box 2969
Hartford, CT 06104-2969


Your sales tax return is due on the last day of the month following the end of your reporting period. For example, if your reporting period is from January 1st to March 31st, your return is due on April 30th.

 

Failure to File Penalty

The failure to file penalty in Connecticut is $50 for each month or fraction of a month that a return is late. The maximum penalty for failure to file is $500.

If you are required to file a Connecticut sales tax return and you fail to file it, you may be subject to the failure to file penalty. The penalty is $50 for each month or fraction of a month that the return is late. The maximum penalty for failure to file is $500.

The failure to file penalty is in addition to any interest that may be due. Interest is calculated at the rate of 1% per month or fraction of a month from the due date of the return until the date the return is filed.

If you are unable to file your return on time, you should contact the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS) as soon as possible. The DRS may be able to grant you an extension to file your return.

 

Underpayment Penalty

If you underpay Connecticut sales tax, you may be subject to an underpayment penalty. The penalty is 1% of the amount of tax that is underpaid for each month or fraction of a month that the underpayment remains unpaid.

 

Failure to Pay Electronically Penalty 

The Failure to Pay Electronically penalty in Connecticut is 10% of the amount of the required tax payment, but not more than $2,500. This penalty applies if you fail to pay your Connecticut sales tax by electronic funds transfer (EFT).

You can pay your Connecticut sales tax electronically by using the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS) website or by using a third-party payment processor. To pay your sales tax electronically, you will need to create an account with the DRS and provide your bank account information. Once you have created an account, you can make payments by credit card, debit card, or EFT.

 If you fail to pay your Connecticut sales tax by electronic funds transfer, you may be subject to the Failure to Pay Electronically penalty. The penalty is 10% of the amount of the required tax payment, but not more than $2,500. The penalty will be assessed on each installment that is not paid electronically.

 

Connecticut Discounts

Connecticut does not have any discounts for filing your sales tax return on time. 

 

Connecticut Sales Tax Holidays

Yes, Connecticut has two sales tax holidays every year.

  • Connecticut has a sales tax free week every year in August. During this week, there is no sales tax on most clothing and footwear items. The dates for the 2023 sales tax free week are August 19-26, 2023.

  • Connecticut has a back-to-school sales tax holiday every year in July. During this week, there is no sales tax on most school supplies. The dates for the 2023 back-to-school sales tax holiday are July 29-August 4, 2023.

 

During these sales tax holidays, the following items are exempt from sales tax:

  • Clothing and footwear items priced under $100.

  • School supplies priced under $50.

There are a few exceptions to these exemptions. For example, clothing and footwear items that are not intended for personal use, such as uniforms and work boots, are not exempt from sales tax. Additionally, school supplies that are not intended for use in school, such as art supplies and craft supplies, are not exempt from sales tax.

 

 

5 Tips to Avoid Common Mistakes When Filing Connecticut Sales Tax Returns

 

Ah, the common pitfalls! Like hidden traps in our sales tax adventure, these mistakes can catch even the most seasoned explorers off guard. But fret not! With this trusty guide, we'll help you navigate safely. Here are five tips to avoid common mistakes when filing your Connecticut sales tax returns:

  1. Keep Accurate Records: Think of this as your compass in the wild wilderness of sales tax. Detailed records of all sales, both taxable and exempt, are essential. Remember, the devil is in the details. If audited, these records will be your saving grace.

  2. Understand Nexus Laws: Nexus rules can be as twisty as a forest path, but understanding them is key. Ensure you fully comprehend both physical and economic nexus laws in Connecticut. When in doubt, seek guidance from a tax professional.

  3. Don't Neglect Exemptions: Exemptions can feel like hidden treasures, but forgetting them can lead to overcharging customers. Understand what goods and services are exempt in Connecticut and apply these exemptions correctly.

  4. File Even If No Sales Tax Was Collected: Yes, you read that right! Connecticut requires filing even if no sales tax was collected during the period. Think of this as a courtesy call to the state, letting them know you didn't forget about them.

  5. Submit On Time: In the sales tax quest, timing is everything. Late filings can result in penalties and interest. Remember, if the due date falls on a weekend or holiday, the state allows you to file on the next business day.

With these five tips in your adventurer's toolkit, you're well-equipped to avoid common mistakes. Here's to a successful and hiccup-free sales tax filing journey!

 


FAQS & Additional Resources

 

Have sales tax in more than one state?

All Sales Tax Guides

Alabama Sales Tax Guide

Hawaii Sales Tax Guide

Massachusetts Sales Tax Guide

New Mexico Sales Tax Guide

South Dakota Sales Tax Guide

Alaska Sales Tax Guide (N/A)

Idaho Sales Tax Guide

Michigan Sales Tax Guide

New York Sales Tax Guide

Tennessee Sales Tax Guide

Arizona Sales Tax Guide

Illinois Sales Tax Guide

Minnesota Sales Tax Guide

North Carolina Sales Tax Guide

Texas Sales Tax Guide

Arkansas Sales Tax Guide

Indiana Sales Tax Guide

Mississippi Sales Tax Guide

North Dakota Sales Tax Guide

Utah Sales Tax Guide

California Sales Tax Guide

Iowa Sales Tax Guide

Missouri Sales Tax Guide

Ohio Sales Tax Guide

Vermont Sales Tax Guide

Colorado Sales Tax Guide

Kansas Sales Tax Guide

Montana Sales Tax Guide (NA)

Oklahoma Sales Tax Guide

Virginia Sales Tax Guide

Connecticut Sales Tax Guide

Kentucky Sales Tax Guide

Nebraska Sales Tax Guide

Oregon Sales Tax Guide (N/A)

Washington Sales Tax Guide

Delaware Sales Tax Guide (N/A)

Louisiana Sales Tax Guide

Nevada Sales Tax Guide

Pennsylvania Sales Tax Guide

West Virginia Sales Tax Guide

Florida Sales Tax Guide

Maine Sales Tax Guide

New Hampshire Sales Tax Guide (NA)

Rhode Island Sales Tax Guide

Wisconsin Sales Tax Guide

Georgia Sales Tax Guide

Maryland Sales Tax Guide

New Jersey Sales Tax Guide

South Carolina Sales Tax Guide

Wyoming Sales Tax Guide

 

And don't forget to check out our blog about Economic Nexus, which serves as an invaluable resource for businesses who have sales that are subject to sales tax. 

 

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This blog is for informational purposes only and the information is accurate as of 2023-06-15. If you want legal advice on sales tax law for your business, please contact a State and Local Tax (SALT) professional. Keep in mind that sales tax regulations and laws are subject to change at any time. While we strive to keep our blog current, this blog possibly may be out of date by the time you review it.

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